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Jewelry Scam Strikes Against Diamond Dealers

According to the news from Jeweler Magazine dated August 10, 2010, a foreign scam is targeting several Australian jewelers among which one retailer has already fallen foul.

The scam reportedly works with the perpetrators utilizing a social-networking website on which they post a fake persona of a diamond dealer. They then gather information from the firm's other offices as also dispatch fake e-mails supposedly claiming payments.

To begin, the scam sends an introductory message, which says that its sender is from Singapore who wishes to buy a few items from the recipient's firm. Subsequently, it says that prior to doing the deal the recipient must answer a few queries given in the message. Accordingly, the e-mail enquires from the retailer whether he'll take the payments through credit card as also deliver abroad through FedEx.

Disturbingly, falling prey to this apparently true transaction, one retailer spent almost $18,000 in transporting the jewelry products to Singapore. However, prior to the delivery, the retailer was able to circumvent it. He said that fortunately, the jewelry item instead of reaching the scammers was reverted to his company in three weeks. Jeweler Magazine reported this.

Elsewhere in Israel, an individual similarly contacted a company through the social-networking website Linkedin while pretending to be a diamond dealer. He called himself "David" a diamantaire, who belonged to a group of forums associated with the diamond business, online.

When the negotiations got done, David said that he would purchase from the company a pair of 3-carot diamonds, however, expressed the desire to pay outside Israel. He as well asked that the jewels be transported to one Turkey client. Moreover, it was mutually agreed that before the shipment, the purchaser would pay in favor of the firm's Hong Kong bank account.

Meanwhile, with the so-called diamond dealer managing to design such an authentic-appearing persona of his own self, the disclosure is considered as a warning for all diamond traders globally.

Further, authorities along with the Israel Diamond Exchange have been duly informed about the scam, and it's expected that the Exchange will issue an alert to each and every affiliate diamond bourse.

ยป SPAMfighter News - 17-08-2010

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