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Series of False YouTube E-mails Propagating on the Internet

As per the security researchers at the Belgian e-mail security company, MX Lab, a series of spam e-mails pretending to have originated from YouTube is presently making rounds on the Internet.

The fake e-mails of this spam campaign come with a subject line of "YouTube Administration sent you a message: Your video on the TOP of YouTube."

The false e-mail messages have their header spoofed to look as if they have come from a service@youtube.com e-mail address and are drafted on the basis of a YouTube template. The body of the e-mail says that, YouTube Administration has dispatched an e-mail message to the receiver. The message notifies users that their video is on the top of YouTube. The message further informs that, users can respond to the e-mail message by going in their inbox.

There are various links within the spam message, comprising the youtube.com one, one on the word "inbox," one on "YouTube Administration," and 3 in top right menu, "help center," "e-mail options" and, "report spam."

All the links in the e-mails indicate towards redirect scripts harbored on legal hacked websites that further direct users to websites selling unregulated drugs under the Canadian Family Pharmacy brand.

Security researchers further stated that, YouTube's rising fame is helping the scam artists to promote their fake online pharmacies, such as the above mentioned spam campaign.

Unfortunately, it is not only the security firm MX Lab that has notified of such a spam campaign taking advantage of the fame of popular video website YouTube.

Another security firm, G Data has also lately notified netizens regarding a similar spam campaign pretending to have originated from YouTube Administration with two variant subject lines.

These two subject lines included: "YouTube Administration sent you a message: Illegal video warning" and "YouTube Administration sent you a message: Your video is approved".

All the links enclosed in every e-mail eventually redirected the users to the Canadian Pharmacy website. G Data highlighted that, several of these websites were compromised and targeted pharmacy websites. MX Labs had also reported the same fact.

Due to the maliciousness linked with these spam campaigns, both the companies suggest netizens to not to put their life at risk with most likely fake and dangerous medication. Conclusively, it is not impossible that, by navigating through the website, users might harm their computer and catch a viral infection which is certainly not treatable with any of the medication provided there.

Related article: Surge in Spam attack

» SPAMfighter News - 04-06-2011

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