BBB Alerts People to Fake Amazon E-mail

BBB is cautioning Internet-users of a scam e-mail within Helena (Montana, USA) citing a phony supply emanating from Amazon.com, thus published 3KRTV.com dated December 9, 2011.

Clearly, the scammers have done lot towards making the spurious electronic mails look genuine Amazon messages, like copying the shipping confirmation code as also adding a date of handing over.

Moreover, the messages state that the receiver bought a $189.95 priced "Fat Loss Monitor" while web-links are provided that lead onto sites, not Amazon.com.

Additionally, with an attractive header: "Your Amazon.com order of "Omron FXB-414M Fat Loss..." has shipped!" the fake message is seen as arriving from "Issac Britt [mailto:delphiniumsfte62@retela.co.jp]."

The text of the e-mail thanking the recipient for shopping at Amazon, asks him to track his packet, while informs that Amazon store shipped the particular segment of the recipient's order separately for providing faster service. There wouldn't be additional shipping fees, while his order's remaining and final part will be shipped immediately when the particular items get ready. Incase the recipient wishes to return any product out of the entire shipment alternatively places any new orders, then he may visit 'Your Orders on Amazon.com,' the text concludes.

Furthermore, the scam message displays certain shipment particulars such as the order name as Omron FXB-414M Fat Loss Monitor with Black priced $149.95; item subtotal being $149.95; nil charge for handling and shipping; and shipment total excluding tax being $149.95 to be remunerated via Visa.

Essentially, the e-mail scammers aim at garnering users' private details via directing them for following a given web-link, while recommend that in case they did follow any web-link then they should scan their PCs for possible viruses.

The e-mails appearing quite innocuous, also display latest purchase validations. And suppose the recipients open them assuming someone in their family made a purchase, malware alerts begin popping up, while the PCs slow down.

Meanwhile, according to Amazon.com, the scammers expect that users who lately conducted purchases will assume a mismatch of their orders; an erroneous billing; alternatively some problem with a lately-performed buying.

Overall BBB emphasizes that users mustn't click the web-links provided while delete the messages instantly.

Related article: BBA Outlines Steps To Ward Off Online Fraud

» SPAMfighter News - 20-12-2011

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