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GFI Documents Fake Anti-viruses Designed for Windows Computers

Specialists from GFI Software the security company lately listed several phony AVs (anti-viruses) for Windows operating system, comprising Windows Software Saver, Windows No-Risk Agent, and more.

Apparently, the Windows No-Risk Agent functions by unleashing scams involving Fake Online Scanner that produces false scan results, stating that the end-user's PC has been contaminated with malware; therefore, he requires loading the otherwise FAKEAV towards cleansing his system. Actually, by utilizing pop-ups, the rogue AV blocks software programs through application of scare tricks in which the end-user's computer system is shown as malware contaminated while he's duped into buying the rogue for a specified price.

Furthermore, the Windows No-Risk Agent as well creates numerous entries into the registry of .exe files of various genuine anti-virus firms for preventing the latter's security software from running on the system.

In the meantime, Windows Software Saver too represents one FAKEAV, which uses the identical ruse of creating scare similar to the Windows No-Risk Agent.

As a matter of fact, Windows Anti-Hazard Center, Windows Anti-Hazard Helper, Windows Guardian Angel, Windows Process Director, Windows Problems Stopper and Windows Software Keeper, all are included into the same classification as well as employ the identical strategy of creating panic, GFI Software outlines.

Unfortunately, those end-users, who are unable to skillfully detect the problem, may think they can solely eliminate the irritating warnings, which the above-mentioned phony AVs repeatedly display, via buying an alleged malware removal device, which normally costs $99-or-so. Certainly, it can't be said for sure that the ploy's perpetrators will then stop sending more warnings despite the sum getting paid, remark the specialists at GFI.

In fact, once these crooks find the victimized users as willingly remitting the sum of money asked, they, by exploiting the naivety, may continue executing more likewise operations.

So it's advisable that Internet-users avoid security software, which do not originate from a reliable entity as also verify the legitimacy of a genuine supplier that maybe charging too low a cost for its security product. Also, end-users who've already been victimized with such criminal tactics should run genuine anti-virus software that'll actually eliminate the threats.

Related article: GPU Processes Fast to Crack Passwords

» SPAMfighter News - 02-04-2012

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