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Fake Lottery E-mail Victimizes Christchurch Man

A man from New Zealand's Christchurch who had his properties severely mutilated due to an earthquake during February 2011 states he became victimized with a lottery e-mail fraud when he responded hoping he'd manage recompensing his loss. 3news.co.nz reported this dated June 18, 2012.

Describing the situation, the man, not wishing for revealing his name, stated that hope gave into outright disaster. 3news.co.nz published this.

Also, among the several fraudulent e-mails coming to him, the first was dated 25th April 2012 that someone from Ghana, a West African country, sent informing him that he was the winner of over $760,000.

Although initially the man doubted, however, soon his doubt turned into belief when he received identification, which seemed genuine, as also after a telecom with the scammers.

He said everything that arrived sounded so very factual, and the con artists were such perfect persuaders.

On their encouragement, he sent cash, apparently to cover administration costs via Western Union; however, as the scammers asked to send additional money, his doubt reappeared.

The subsequent e-mails he got were messages by 'Infidelity Bank' that prompted him to visit their website and check the details. But this time too he got duped into further wiring 'insurance fees.'

When more demands for money arrived, the man eventually refused to comply.

Moreover, despite disconnecting the telephone line with the scammers, the latter continued to send e-mails. One e-mail dispatched during the 2nd-week of June 2012 asserted its sender was the Chief-of-Police of Ghana. Approximately $20,000 was lost in aggregate, the man calculated, which he described as plenty. He said that although he hadn't gone bankrupt, he wasn't any rich either. Stuff.co.nz published this in June 2012.

The man admitted that he'd been victimized with his own folly.

On requesting for verification by his bank about the scammers' numerical figures of the prize-money, the bank merely laughed at the idea.

He even presented the related papers before the bank so officials could check their authenticity, however, they refused.

Finally he said that he didn't report to Police since he didn't trust he'd manage retrieving the lost sums.

Related article: Fake-mails Troubling Credit Union Customers

» SPAMfighter News - 23-06-2012

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