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Cyber-crooks Intrude Opera Networks

Opera, situated in Norway, and creator of a Web-browser that's extremely popular worldwide, recently declared one network intrusion of a rather frightening type that cyber-criminals attempted on it. Nakedsecurity.sophos.com published this dated June 27, 2013.

In a recently-released brief advisory, Opera stated that its experts, on June 19, 2013, detected, stopped and contained the attack. And though administrators managed to wholly sanitize the network as also still required unearthing any clue about user data getting seized, there were yet certain worrying consequences of the breach.

The advisory explained that the attackers managed in acquiring one-or-more software authorization certificate of Opera that was old and obsolete which they actually employed for authorizing their own malware. Consequently, they were able to disseminate that malware, which wrongly looked as Opera Software-published alternatively looked as the Opera Web-browser. The advisory added that on June 19, 2013, thousands of people working on Windows during 1.00-1.36 Universal Time and using Opera possibly mechanically received as well as downloaded the malware. Arstechnica.com published this dated June 27, 2013.

It's, however, unexplained in Opera's advisory as to what time the attackers started acquiring admission into the servers, the exact time of expiry of the seized code-signing certificate, as also if it could be thought the attackers obtained other certificates too.

Opera stated that as a precautionary measure it would release one fresh edition of its browser that would also have one fresh digital certificate. Subsequently, the company is urging consumers for deploying the update at the earliest. Meanwhile, Opera advised consumers for accessing VirusTotal to know the suites it had for identifying the malware.

Questioning about Opera's notification of the assault, Senior Technology Consultant and Security blogger Graham Cluley at Sophos said that one couldn't help but feel like asking how Opera could so heroically declare "Security breach halted," to twist and turn the incident away from attention. Itnews.com.au published this dated June 27, 2013.

Opera, however, maintaining cool against security researchers' angry queries concluded that it was working with officials who handled such situations for digging out the origin of the assault as well as to know any possible future attempts.

» SPAMfighter News - 04-07-2013

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