Wi-Fi Users can be at Risk of WPA2 Vulnerability Exploitation

 

The security protocol WPA of Wi-Fi has developed devastating vulnerability that if attackers exploit they can intercept a user's data when that person takes Wi-Fi connection. The vulnerability called KRACK impacts Wi-Fi's security procedure rather than any particular product/implementation, while attacks any safeguarded Wi-Fi network of today, explains security researcher Mathy Vanhoef the discoverer of the flaw. Accordingly, any device connected to Wi-Fi gets affected with KRACK.

 

Vanhoef cautions users of Wi-Fi connection that even if password-protected, the connection is at risk of being hacked. His co-discoverer of the vulnerability Frank Piessens and Vanhoef himself belonging to KU Leuven University situated in Belgium assert they found a flaw inside the WPA2 security protocol of Wi-Fi, to be precise, which makes Wi-Fi connections, even if password-protected, susceptible to cyber assaults as well as tampering. The probable outcome following the discovery is spreading across different parts of the world, including India.

 

The flaw was tested with researchers executing an attack. They discovered that the assault was effective on every safeguarded Wi-Fi network of the current period. The assault was also effective on slightly over forty percent of the entire devices that were Android's. At present, suppliers of OSs and devices are developing security updates. Timesofindia.indiatimes.com posted this dated October 17, 2017.

 

Vanhoef writes in blog that by exploiting the vulnerability attackers can read things which thus far had been thought as safely encrypted. The things range from e-mails, photos and chat-messages to passwords and credit card details.

 

The researcher writes the vulnerability is further usable in letting an attacker insert malware, in particular, ransomware into online sites. By abusing KRACK flaw, cyber attackers can bypass certain Wi-Fi connection "key" which maintains privacy of data.

 

Google statistics show that as of May 2017, over 2bn Android devices active per month are in use globally. The devices subsequently get manipulated so become connected with the flawed Wi-Fi system wherein the attacker plays "man-in-the-middle" of end-user at one end and original network at the other.

 

To be safe from KRACK, consumers most simply require using an ethernet connection over the cable alternatively continuing with their phone's cellular connection.

» SPAMfighter News - 24-10-2017

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