Hacking affects U.S. Navy War College’s Computer Network

Associated Press reported on December 5, 2006 that some hackers hijacked the computer network at the U.S. 'Naval War College' in Newport, Rhode Island. While investigators are working to find them and to prevent another attack , the school's Web site and external e-mail has been closed for two weeks.

The hacking attack took place in mid-November 2006 following which the U.S. Navy's War College had to shut down its computer network. An instructor explained to his class that scrutiny of the College's servers was ongoing to find what the hackers took, changed or left behind. This was the most recent of many attacks on 'Department of Defense' computers originating in China.

The Navy officials refused to say anything about the source of the attack. According to Cmdr. Doug Gabos, spokesman for 'Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command', the kind of the intrusion and its extent were operational issues that he could not discuss. The site was shut down by the orders of Navy Cyber Defense Operations Command. The college's site also remains inactive due for an investigation.

Gabos said the Navy's networks are checked innumerable times everyday, but this particular type of intrusion was rare. To take the system completely offline was unusual for the Navy.

He further said that investigators were searching 'forensic evidence' to understand the extent of the intrusion. He assured they were upgrading firewalls and adopting necessary steps. Gabos said as soon as the investigation was complete, they would restore the network.

U.S. defense officials said that according to intelligence reports, the cyber attack on the college seemed to come from China. A recent congressional report said there was a series of 'computer network attacks' targeting defense and military systems in the United States code-named "Titan Rain".

The 'Department of Defense' is especially concerned because they have more computers than consumers have. These PCs are connected to as many as 12,000 different networks, most of which are connected to the Internet.

Cmdr. Karen Seller, spokesperson for the school said, the campus e-mail was working although it was not possible to send or receive e-mails from outside. She said it was certainly inconvenient but the security of network was upper most.

Related article: Hacking Attacks Are Increasing to Haunt Banks

» SPAMfighter News - 11-12-2006

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