ABN Amro Bank Phishing E-mails Target Dutch and Belgian Users

According to MX Lab, cyber-criminals are distributing phishing e-mails written in Netherlands' national language while aiming at the inboxes of ABN Amro clients in The Netherlands and Belgium, published softpedia.com dated April 11, 2012.

Addressing recipients of the fraudulent electronic mail, the message states that ABN Amro lately examined the user's account and doubted some unauthorized intermediate entity may've accessed it. The Bank regards his account security with the greatest importance. Thus, to be precautious, ABN Amro has tentatively restricted the use of the sensitive characteristics of his account. However, use of the account can be restored provided he confirms his identifiable details.

Thereafter, the e-mail states that for making the confirmation, the user must click on a given web-link that connects to www.abnamro.nl/en/login/identification and enter his credentials. It then thanks him for giving the bank time to do the needful for safeguarding his account. It also suggests that the bank can provide the user with information that's most relevant if he merely indicates his e-mail choices. Certainly, he can choose to opt out whenever he wants. Besides, the e-mail reiterates that ABN Amro Bank will always look after his protection and safety. To know more, he can go to the bank's Information Security part within the 'privacy and security' page of its website, the message ends.

However, the web-link within the e-mail leads onto one malevolent page, which advises the user just turned victim for handing over sensitive information, including passwords, credit card details, PINs along with more data, which genuine e-mails from banking institutions never ask for.

Meanwhile, in a similar phishing attack targeting ABN Amro Bank clients, MX Lab, during November 2011, spotted various forms of ABN Amro-related spoofed electronic mails, which daily circulated online aiming Dutch accountholders of ABN Amro. The security investigators at MX Lab studied and found that there were 5 versions of the same fake electronic mail.

Thus, security specialists suggest Internauts to remain vigilant about the above kinds of e-mails, particularly if they claim to be bank notifications soliciting users' PINs, passwords or other personal information, while delete the messages without the slightest delay.

Related article: ABN Amro’s Two-Factor Authentication System Vulnerable to phishing Attacks

» SPAMfighter News - 18-04-2012

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