Over 50% of Malware Analysts Report of Probing Unrevealed Breaches

As per the findings of a recent survey of 200 security experts dealing with malware analysis within US companies, 57% of survey respondents revealed they have probed a data-breach which was never publically revealed by their corporation, reported esecurityplanet.com on November 6, 2013.

And it is even truer in case of larger companies with in excess of 500 employees where 66% of respondents said that they had handled undisclosed data breaches.

The survey conducted by Opinion Matters on behalf of ThreatTrack Security in October 2013, also established that 40% of survey-participants think that one of the most difficult aspects of defending their company's network is the shortage of extremely-skilled security workforce.

Amusingly, many malware contaminations are the resultant of executives visiting mature websites, clicking on maligned URLs in phishing e-mails, installing grey mobile apps and allowing family members to use company's device.

Security experts do not have admission into a computerized malware analysis machine in 35% cases because of which in excess of 50% (or half) of them take over two-hours to study a sample of new malware. Only 4% of the survey respondents said that they can do the work in less than sixty minutes.

However, companies, whether big or small, are not doing their own selves or anybody else any favoritism by not informing them when a breach does occur or by not shedding light on how an unwanted malware attack affected networks and operations of the business. Security is a mutual endeavor. The finest way to overcome attacks is by sharing information.

Itbusinessedge.com published a statement on 7th November, 2013 quoting a comment of Julian Waits, Sr. CEO of ThreatTrack on the intriguing findings of the study as saying that although it's disappointing that so many malware analysts are conscious of data breaches that companies haven't revealed, it's not surprising that breaches are taking place. Each day, malware becomes increasingly advanced and US companies are continuously targeted with cyber espionage campaigns by overseas competitors and foreign governments. This study tells that malware analysts are deeply conscious of the fears they face. Many of them report advancement in their capability to combat cyberattacks however they also figure out insufficiencies in resources and tools".

ยป SPAMfighter News - 13-11-2013

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