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Time Warner Customers Receive Phishing E-Mail

According to reports coming in from 'Time Warner Cable', an entertainment company, it has confirmed a new phishing scam making rounds these days. The scam involves sending of electronic messages to people that falsely claim of representing 'Road Runner'. And while Time Warner officially declared the phishing scam, it reported of receiving over 200 e-mails connected with it.

Reports indicate that the scam e-mails from the phishers request for recipients' personal information like credit card and bank account numbers as well as Social Security numbers so that their service is kept active.

According to a letter from Time Warner/Road Runner, the company cautions users against such phishing messages and also informs them that it would never ask for customers' password or billing details over e-mail, as reported by TIME WARNER CABLE on September 4, 2008.

Meanwhile, as Warner revealed about the circulation of the phishing e-mail, there were reports of hundreds of Warner customers already affected with the new phishing fraud.

Also, security experts, who are making an effort to trace the sender of the phishing message, state that the method of operation being used in the scam is the same as the traditional one. The phishing message appears via a pop-up window on the recipient's desktop, claiming to come from Time Warner Cable.

Jessica Jester, a possible victim of the scam, states that on the morning of September 4, 2008, she received two electronic mails from Time Warner Cable, as reported by WOAI on September 4, 2008.

Jester says that the phishing messages look genuine and authentic although the word arrangements in the message hint that the message could be one of those scams that frequently disturb Internet users.

She further said that the letters aroused suspicion as it contained the spelling of 'you' as 'U' and the sentence construction -"We apologize if U, your Texas driver's license number..." These clearly hinted to her that she was being trapped in a phishing fraud, Jester explained. In fact, the questions asked in the e-mail too made Jester suspicious.

Related article: Twin Phishing E-Mails Pose from Bank of Hanover

ยป SPAMfighter News - 16-09-2008

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